Economics: A Dietary Solution to Climate Change.

‘The Government should put a ban on certain food consumption for people above a certain weight!’ -Philip Christian Nigg

As controversial as it may sound, is it not like a tax or quota system for overweight people who are at a health risk?
It is in fact a brilliant idea to help overweight people! Know the calories you are absorbing!

However, how will this help climate change?

Setting the stage:

Although CO2 is the main greenhouse gas that is the core to climate change politics around the world, what about the other greenhouse gases?
Why is there only a carbon tax and not a greenhouse gas tax?

Methane:
Methane remains in the atmosphere for 9-15 years and it traps 20 times more heat than CO2.
In some sense it is much worse than CO2.

So, where does methane usual come from? Animal agriculture!
Animal farming in the modern-day mainly produces to feed humans. Now that may not sound bad prima facie,
however, we eat more than we really should! Basic economics will tell us that if we demand more food, supply will increase!

Calories:
The average man and woman only needs to consume 2,700 and 2,000 calories per day respectively.
However, the average consumption of calories per person precedes that in the world. (Not to mention the Calorie consumption difference between the developed and less developed countries)

Essentially, if calorie consumption is curbed, consumption of certain meats will diminish and which will lead to decrease supply in animal agriculture and thus lowered methane production.
It is a policy that will benefit the average overweight person, the climate, health services and disposable income.

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2 responses

  1. hahaha, good entree,view check out this article !

    http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/05/11/taxing-obesity/?scp=1&sq=obesity%20and%20tax&st=cse

    On an additional note it is intersting how you have related Obesity to the Climate change, quite a smart idea.. but here are some other intersting articles which I found after looking up more information :

    http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/05/11/taxing-obesity/?scp=1&sq=obesity%20and%20tax&st=cse

    and

    http://www.alternet.org/food/146093/behind_the_shady_world_of_marketing_junk_food_to_children?page=1

    Viva

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